Maschinenpistole MP40 - Denix®

8408010009921

Denix

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This is a non-firing full-size replica of MP40 Maschinenpistole used by the German army. This would make a great addition to any collectors or reenactors. Like all Denix Weapons, this prop replica uses metal (except for the plastic grips and sides), removable magazinne and contains movable parts and springs. Made by Denix.

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135,00 € Tax included

Weight :3.66 kg
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Maschinenpistole MP40 - Denix®

Maschinenpistole MP40 - Denix®

This is a non-firing full-size replica of MP40 Maschinenpistole used by the German army. This would make a great addition to any collectors or reenactors. Like all Denix Weapons, this prop replica uses metal (except for the plastic grips and sides), removable magazinne and contains movable parts and springs. Made by Denix.

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The MP 40 descended from its predecessor, the MP 38, which was in turn based on the MP 36, a prototype made of machined steel. The MP 36 was developed independently by Erma Werke's Berthold Geipel with funding from the German Army. It took design elements from Heinrich Vollmer's VPM 1930 and EMP. Vollmer then worked on Berthold Geipel's MP 36 and in 1938 submitted a prototype to answer a request from the German Armament services for a new submachine gun, which was adopted as MP 38. The MP 38 was a simplification of the MP 36, and the MP 40 was a further simplification of the MP 38, with certain cost-saving alterations, notably in the more extensive use of stamped steel rather than machined parts.

The MP 40 was often called the "Schmeisser" by the Allies, after weapons designer Hugo Schmeisser. Schmeisser had designed the MP 18, which was the first mass-produced submachine gun, and saw extensive service at the end of the First World War. He did not, however, design the MP 40, although he held a patent on the magazine. He later designed the MP 41, which was an MP 40 with a wooden rifle stock and a selector, identical to those found on the earlier MP 28 submachine gun. The MP 41 was not introduced as a service weapon with the German Army, but saw limited use with some SS and police units. They were also exported to Germany's ally, Romania. The MP 41's production run was brief, as Erma filed a successful patent infringement lawsuit against Schmeisser's employer, Haenel.

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